Memphis Milano

 

The 80s isn’t generally thought of as a decade of high design; from scrunchies and crimped hair to neon and shoulder pads, it was an era that makes a lot of people cringe.  The Memphis design movement was one of the few exceptions to the 80s rule.

Founded in 1981 by Ettore Sottsass, Memphis Milano was a reaction to the darker, more minimal design of the 70s.  The group included writers, architects, and designers who created furniture, materials, and objects.  They were all over the map, and their influence was global.

Their goal was to create furniture and objects that defied boundaries.  The idea was that any one piece could be placed in any given space in a way that would intentionally clash/mesh with the surrounding items in a just right sort of way.  The Memphis designers wanted to break out of the rigid rules of previous schools of design, and through the use of   bright colors and intense patterns Memphis pieces fit into any space by essentially not fitting.  A little of it goes a long way, but in the most excellent direction!

Sottsass left the movement in 1985 and it dismantled in 1988.  Lots of people still hate Memphis, but more and more are loving it.  I think it’s ripe for a comeback.

 

Advertisements

Bloomingdale’s: The Art of the Shopping Bag

“Our goal was to make the shopping bag a symbol of Bloomingdale’s sense of confidence and creative output. So we changed the art of the bag 3 to 4 times a year; each became an instant collector’s item.”

John C. Jay, Bloomingdale’s creative director

Artists: (top rows, from left) Anne Fields, Anthony Russo, Susan Curtis, Mark Kostabi, Ettore Sottsass; (middle) Gene Greif; (bottom rows) Kazamasa Nagai, Tim Girvin, K. Kimura and K. Tejima, Neville Brody, Michael Graves, Per Arnoldi, Sigrido Martin Begue, Malcom Garrett; Client: Bloomingdale’s